Challenges in reaching large numbers of children with quality content.

  Educators who seek to maintain and expand programmes that successfully address important curricular content such as life skills and peace education may face challenges.Some evidence suggests that expansion beyond pilot programmes often falters even when pilot programmes are successful and educational agencies provide adequate resources for the development and implementation of curriculum that responds … Continue reading “Challenges in reaching large numbers of children with quality content.”

 

Educators who seek to maintain and expand programmes that successfully address important curricular content such as life skills and peace education may face challenges.Some evidence suggests that expansion beyond pilot programmes often falters even when pilot programmes are successful and educational agencies provide adequate resources for the development and implementation of curriculum that responds to emerging issues. Several reasons for this exist (Obanya, 1995), including:

  •  Teachers often find curricular integration and interdisciplinarity difficult, especially when the teacher does not have a role in curriculum design;
  •  Subjects that do not appear on important examinations are not always taken seriously;
  •  Social attitudes towards the subject may not be favorable, and cultural patterns are difficult to change;
  •  Ideas conceived in other regions of the world may not be adequately adapted to the local context;
  •  Political and economic instability can lead to discontinuity in policies and programmes, as well as teacher and administrator turnover.

    These obstacles pose serious but not insurmountable challenges to educational programming. The value of quality content, however, makes finding solutions to such challenges critical. To be most effective, quality content must be situated in a context of quality processes.

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