Active, standards-based participation methods.

  Education that supports and empowers both teachers and students through democratic processes increasingly defines quality in the 21st century. An example of how schools might organize learning activities around these principles comes from Uganda. With help from USAID’s Improving Educational Quality project, researchers collaborated with teachers in primary schools in Uganda to develop action … Continue reading “Active, standards-based participation methods.”

 

Education that supports and empowers both teachers and students through democratic processes increasingly defines quality in the 21st century. An example of how schools might organize learning activities around these principles comes from Uganda. With help from USAID’s Improving Educational Quality project, researchers collaborated with teachers in primary schools in Uganda to develop action research opportunities for students that would exemplify empowering student-centred education. In one school, for example, students identified the problem area of student tardiness and selected it for study. They collected and analysed data tracking attendance and mapping the homes and routes tardy children took to school. Based on these data, more punctual students teamed up with their slower classmates who lived nearby, and devised systems to encourage them along (Kanyike, L., Namanya, P., & Clair, N., 1999). Among other things, this type of learning activity promotes critical thinking, problem solving, teamwork, and community involvement. Such activities can build the attitudes and values in children that contribute to democratic societies.

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